WELFARE QUEENS

The term “Welfare Queen” is about a woman named Linda Taylor, if that is her real name. And yes, she was a con artist to the tenth degree. The interesting part about it is, where did she learn how to be several steps ahead of the police and the many detectives on her trail for several years? Her life is as ghostly as the welfare queen myth is.

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The nation’s poorest state used welfare money to pay Brett Favre for speeches he never made.

Why would hard-working so-called “Make America Great Again” white people steal from poor people?

Is it because they can, and if poor people don’t catch them, then do they feel entitled? 70 million dollars later, the picking yourself up by your own bootstraps; which is an impossibility, the only logical way to do that then would be to STEAL and cheat; and they know it!

So in the words of Nina Simone, “Mississippi Godamn.” No wonder this state has a water problem. Ironically conservative doesn’t believe climate change is real because they are the overconsumption problem within the climate. Will Black America get what’s going on here? In the scheme of things, will Black America reconcile this as just another systemic race issue?

The moral of the story is “NARCRACISM” If we could see those who deal with the political system, the education system, the justice system, the medical and pharmaceutical system, the financial system, and lastly all Armed forces system, aka military, you begin to see they are all run and governed by NARCS.

The term “Welfare Queen” is about a woman named Linda Taylor, if that is her real name. And yes, she was a con artist to the tenth degree. The interesting part about it is, where did she learn how to be several steps ahead of the police and the many detectives on her trail for several years? Her life is as ghostly as the welfare queen myth is.

The many scammers, white-male thieves, killers; serial and all, criminals of European ancestry don’t become political causes and campaign poster-children, nor do their faces become synonymized with bad morals.

SDMNEWS BRINGS YOU THIS PERSPECTIVE

The nation’s poorest state used welfare money to pay Brett Favre for speeches he never made

The state auditor says $70 million in federal welfare funds went to Favre, a volleyball complex and a former pro wrestler in a scandal that has rocked Mississippi.

Brett Favre earned nearly $140 million as a star NFL quarterback over two decades and millions more in product endorsements.

But that didn’t stop the state of Mississippi from paying Favre $1.1 million in 2017 and 2018 to make motivational speeches — out of federal welfare funds intended for needy families. The Mississippi state auditor said Favre never gave the speeches and demanded the money back, with interest.

Black women are Welfare Queens while others are something else, Black women are theives of the state.

Favre has repaid the fees, although not the $228,000 in interest. the auditor also demanded. But the revelation by the auditor that $70 million in TANF welfare funds was doled out to a multimillionaire athlete, a professional wrestler, a horse farm, and a volleyball complex is at the heart of a scandal that has rocked the nation’s poorest state, sparking parallel state and federal criminal investigations that have led to charges and guilty pleas involving some of the key players.

Favre hasn’t been accused of a crime or charged, and he declined an interview. His lawyer, Bud Holmes, said he did nothing wrong and never understood he was paid with money intended to help poor children. Holmes acknowledged that the FBI had questioned Favre in the case, a fact that hasn’t previously been reported.

The saga, which has been boiling at low grade for 2½ years, drew new attention in July when the state welfare agency fired a lawyer who had been hired to claw back some of the money, just after he issued a subpoena seeking more information about the roles of Favre and the former governor, Phil Bryant, a Republican. The current governor, Republican Tate Reeves, acknowledged playing a role in the decision to sack Brad Pigott, accusing the Bill Clinton-appointed former U.S. attorney of having a political agenda. But the state official who first uncovered the misspending and fraud, auditor Shad White, is a Republican.

Brad Pigott was hired to claw back some of the TANF money. He was fired just after he issued a subpoena seeking more information about the roles of Brett Favre and former Gov. Phil Bryant.NBC News

In his first television interview since he was fired, Pigott said his only agenda was to get at the truth and to recoup U.S. taxpayer funds sent to Mississippi that he says were “squandered.”

“The notion of tens of millions of dollars that was intended by the country to go to the alleviation of poverty — and to see it going toward very different purposes — was appalling to many of us,” he said. “Mr. Favre was a very great quarterback, but having been a great NFL quarterback, he is not well acquainted with poverty.” 

Pigott, who before he was fired sued on behalf of Mississippi’s welfare agency, naming Favre and 37 other grant recipients, laid ultimate blame at the feet of top Mississippi politicians, including Bryant.

“Governor Bryant gave tens of millions of dollars of this TANF welfare money to a nonprofit led by a person who he knew well and who had more connections with his political party than with the good people in Mississippi who have the heart and the skills to actually cajole people out of poverty or prevent teenage pregnancies,” he said.

In an interview with the website Mississippi Today, Bryant said he never knew the grants came from welfare money. His lawyer didn’t respond to requests for comment.

The person in charge of the nonprofit group Pigott was referring to is Nancy New, a close friend of Bryant’s wife. New and her son have pleaded guilty to state and federal charges and agreed to cooperate. New, a key player in doling out the money, said in a court document that Bryant was among those involved in directing the transactions. Her lawyer declined to comment.

The former head of the state welfare agency, John Davis, has pleaded not guilty to state charges of bribery and conspiracy, and law enforcement officials say the investigations continue.

Favre defended himself in a series of tweets last year against allegations from White, the state auditor, that he accepted state money for speeches he never intended to give.

“I would never knowingly take funds meant to help our neighbors in need, but for Shad White to continue to push out this lie that the money was for no-show events is something I cannot stay silent about,” Favre tweeted.

The state auditor rejected Favre’s defense in a series of tweets that pointed to the contract he obtained and said, “You can continue to use your megaphone as a celebrity to drown out the facts, but it will not change the facts.”

The speeches aren’t the only welfare grants tied to Favre. Text messages obtained by Mississippi Today and authenticated by Pigott show that Favre sought a $3.2 million grant for a drug company in which he was a shareholder and a $5 million award that built a volleyball arena at the University of Southern Mississippi, where his daughter played the sport and where he played football. Favre’s lawyer declined to comment.

The drug company, Prevacus, was touting treatments to mitigate the effects of concussions, although none were approved by the Food and Drug Administration. In some texts, Favre suggested awarding shares in the drug company to Bryant while he was governor.

“Don’t know if legal or not but we need to cut him in,” Favre texted a company official in November 2018, referring to Bryant. Following up three days later, Favre wrote, “Also if legal I’ll give some of my shares to the Governor.”

Sept. 1, 2022, 3:13 PM PDT

By Ken Dilanian and Laura Strickler

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